Weekly Marvel Roundup for 10/07 – 10/14

Weekly Marvel Roundup for 10/7 - 10/14

Weekly Marvel Roundup for 10/7 - 10/14

Reviews by MattzLadd, CMRO Contributor

 

Brace yourselves, this is a big one.

Avengers #0 (One-Shot)

Supremacy [Squadron Supreme]
Written By James Robinson
Art By Leonard Kirk, Paul Neary and Frank Martin

Synopsis – The Squadron Supreme examine the various Avengers teams as they accustom to the world.

This is the overarching story of this book, and it features a team I didn’t think would be spotlighted – especially not in an Avengers introduction. The Squadron have been featured recently in Secret Wars and prior to that with other books, but they are usually only utilised in conjunction with the Squadron Sinister team of villains. They are admittedly a confusing variation of DC’s Justice League, and they exist as both heroes and villains, so I think some clarification is required for the new team’s debut in their own title. They are certainly a threat to plenty of Marvel characters, and their team is powerful and interesting, but I don’t see why Marvel would place such a strange group at the forefront of this book. It also appears that the creative teams will be the same for the respective group’s own title, and the art for this is certainly good – though there are better displays throughout this issue.
Story – 7/10
Art – 8/10

 

Eidetic [All-New, All-Different Avengers]
Written By Mark Waid
Art By Mahmud Asrar and Sonia Oback

Synopsis – The Vision meets with Scarlet Witch to discuss some disturbing developments.

I think with the All-New, All-Different line-up being, well, all new and all different, and the importance of the main Avengers title at this stage, variation is required in some form to each of the characters featured in the team. Four are new members, Cap’s mantle has only recently been taken up by Sam Wilson and Iron Man has received a new suit. Thus, the Vision needs to have some drastic change shown early in the reintroduction, meaning the debut issue is perfect to focus on the Vision. His changes are something unprecedented for the character, and they could have far-reaching implications. The situation is very dramatic and quite emotional if you are familiar with the character and his relationship with Wanda Maximoff. Great visuals illustrate each scene, and there’s a reoccurring art style throughout that diversifies from the usual art format.
Story – 9/10
Art – 10/10

 

In the Beginning [A-Force]
Written By G. Willow Wilson
Art By Victor Ibanez and Laura Martin

Synopsis – A-Force reassembles to investigate a mysterious light entity.

This team is the most recently formed of all featured in this book, and so they have little amounts of continuity with which to build upon. The Singularity is back, seemingly as a staple now to the A-Force features, and perhaps when we actually find out who she / it is it can stop being the primary focus of the A-Force books. I also don’t like how the main protagonist appears to be Captain Marvel – a position she has assumed too much, especially with their apparently being two versions of her in this new Universe – though the cover of the new book does have She-Hulk in the middle. I only hope it stays that way. I am glad, however, that this team is reappearing, as they hold at lot of promise and are definitely a formidable team to have around.
Story – 6/10
Art – 8/10

 

Everything is New [New Avengers]
Written By Al Ewing
Art By Gerardo Sandoval and Dona Sanchez Almara

Synopsis – A sinister new force arises to combat the New Avengers.

There’s really not much to say about this excerpt. It acts as an expositional device to set up the New Avengers’ actions in their first issue via a flurry of scenes in a couple of double page spreads. The team appears to be very varied, and they have some interesting figures so I am looking forward to the title itself, but the most notable thing from this book is the introduction of what I assume is a completely new faction named W.H.I.S.P.E.R., and their familiar figurehead whom I definitely did not expect to appear. I can’t see how that person connects to Roberto da Costa or his New Avengers, but I suppose it will all become clear in time.
Story – 6/10
Art – 7/10

 

The Night That Hell Froze Over [Uncanny Avengers]
Written By Gerry Duggan
Art By Ryan Stegman and Richard Isanove

Synopsis – A long-awaited recruitment to the Avengers roster in enacted.

Well, I sort of hoped this would never happen, but yes – Deadpool is now a member of the Avengers in some form. I was content enough with the ambiguous membership that occurred in Original Sin, due to Deadpool blackmailing Iron Man to be named as an Avenger, but this is supposedly official – and despite it being the Avengers Unity Squad (now comprised of humans, mutants and Inhumans) he does receive an Avengers Identicard. I can’t see much good coming out of this, I think Deadpool works better on his own and one of his primary gags is his often failing tropes with the Avengers, but I am excited for the team and their book itself so I’ll give this a chance.
Story – 6/10
Art – 7/10

 

The Opposite of Kicking [Ultimates]
Written By Al Ewing
Art By Kenneth Rocafort and Dan Brown

Synopsis – Ms. America encounters a dimensional breach as the Ultimates consider her as a member.

This team appears to be very promising. The Ultimates are no longer a 1610 team, though due to America’s monologue throughout this issue it does seem that a Multiverse exists. This highlights some immediate curiosities that we will need to know about the new situation following Secret Wars. My bets are on the Silver Surfer title being the one to capture the changes, but in that they explain he is only recreating the Universe and not the Multiverse. Nevertheless, Ms. America is an interesting character that I haven’t personally seen in main comics as much as I should have, and the rest of the team are equally if not more powerful, making for a formidable line-up indeed. This art is fantastic, also.
Story – 8/10
Art – 10/10

 

Amazing Spider-Man #1
Written By Dan Slott
Art By Giuseppe Camuncoli, Cam Smith and Marte Gracia

Synopsis – Parker Industries’ new prominent position allows for great successes to be made, but greater threats to arise…

Peter Parker has always been so popular because of his relatability – his lack of funds, conflicting responsibilities and so on, but with his company’s widespread achievements he appears to not have any of those problems anymore. This puts him in a new position that may not be as relatable, and as he says in this book it makes him a ‘poor man’s Tony Stark’ but I don’t think the changes will prove too much of a detriment to his popularity. I very much enjoyed seeing old supporting characters with new ones having positions in PI, and the utilisation of the Zodiac as the ostensible prime villains is a good choice. This book is full of comedy and drama as a Spider-Man book should be, and the development in this introductory issue shows that Slott already has a plan for what he is doing. This book is good for both new readers and experienced readers alike, and the great art would definitely not put people off. This was a great issue, and I like the potential implications the situation could have on this new world.
Story – 10/10
Art – 9/10

 

Contest of Champions #1
Written By Al Ewing
Art By Paco Medina, Juan Vlasco and David Curiel

Synopsis – Nigel Higgins, once the ‘Outlaw’, lives a quiet and conflict-free life – until he is ‘summoned’ to the mysterious Contest of Champions.

I wasn’t expecting much from this – I’ve played the Contest of Champions game and it’s only plot is that the Collector gathers AU characters and has them fight one another. Then again, in this day and age with things like the ‘Hunger Games’ being supremely popular, why wouldn’t this work? I do think the whole idea works better as a game (and likely very well if Marvel would only move away from mobile gaming) but the idea of a CoC comic book is not outlandish. It’s always fun to see characters we know fight and kill one another, and since there is no consequence as they are primarily AU characters – main characters can perish along with unknown ones. The ‘British Punisher’ is an interesting choice for a protagonist, and I think he holds a lot of promise. The fun, if somewhat underdeveloped, story paired with the great art makes for a good issue, but I don’t know how long the team can keep things intriguing without introducing a new development into the mix.
Story – 8/10
Art – 9/10

 

Doctor Strange #1
Written By Jason Aaron
Art By Chris Bachalo, Tim Townsend, Al Vey and Mark Irwin

Synopsis – Doctor Strange becomes concern as harbingers of a deadly ‘storm’ begin to appear.

This book hits all the right notes that a new volume (and a pseudo re-introduction) should hit. It captures the personality of the protagonist while providing a new, threatening antagonist to them. In this issue, the threat takes the form of several unnatural occurrences that New York’s magic practisers express as such. These occurrences let the artists explore a magical world within the normal one, and it’s a fascinating style I have not seen before in a magic-based title. Stephen Strange is also developed with his fundamental traits via his interactions and daily life, and as a cliffhanger a new supporting character takes the foreground. The enemy of this book is disturbing and certainly promising for the issues to come, and this story shows that Aaron has a plan set in motion.
Story – 9/10
Art – 7/10

 

Invincible Iron Man #1
Written By Brian Michael Bendis
Art By David Marquez and Justin Ponsor

Synopsis – Tony Stark undergoes change in regard to a new armour, and an old foe leads him to a dangerous meeting.

While this new armour looks awesome, it is kind of a deus ex machina in itself, being able to utilise any of the previous armour’s abilities and change into many different forms. For a viable villain to oppose him, either there will have to be some flaws to the armour or everyone will need a power boost. The story isn’t quite as drastically changed from the usual formula as Spider-Man or Doctor Strange, but a new supporting character provides a potentially far-reaching alteration to a group I would not expect to be heavily mentioned in the first issue of this series. The ending, also, raises some important questions that can only be answered by Battleworld’s climax, but I am willing to put such questions aside until the creation of the new Multiverse is explained – and that’s no easy feat. The art for this issue is incredible – there are some panels which I don’t see how they could have been drawn through most available techniques. It’s definitely the high point of this issue, as the story is lacking in most action and some clarification.
Story – 7/10
Art – 10/10

 

What If? Infinity – Inhumans #1 (One-Shot)
Written By Joshua Williamson
Art By Riley Rossmo and Ivan Plascencia

Synopsis – What if Black Bolt had betrayed Earth?

What Ifs can certainly be interesting, as instead of the excessive changes made in many of the Alternate Universes, we usually see the 616 Universe with a few minor changes that can, via collateral impacts, change everything. This issue shows us a dystopian future ruled by Thanos, with Black Bolt as his puppet. I believe the choice Blackagar made was for the greater good and I think it would fit with his personality to make that decision, so this What If actually makes sense. Other featured Inhuman’s reactions are also within the bounds of the characters also – Inferno has a great role in this book and the Royal Family remain as such but with arbitrary plots enacted (though some irksome things occur to Gorgon and my favourite Karnak). There’s also a ridiculously cool team-up that I won’t hint upon. I don’t like the art much but it is decent in ways.
Story – 9/10
Art – 6/10

 

What If? Infinity – Thanos #1 (One-Shot)
Written By Joshua Williamson
Art By Mike Henderson and Jordan Boyd

Synopsis – What if Thanos joined the Avengers?

Again, this book provides us with a compelling twist to the Infinity story that we received. While this is not as much of a variation to the Inhumans issue, it does cast a different light on Thanos’ involvement in Infinity – with Thane and his secret plots. I didn’t actually think Thanos’ storyline necessarily needed to be a core part of the Infinity event, but this book makes it much more related to the Builders and the ending suggests that in the Alternate Universe in which this occurred – if it was ever continued – the end of the Multiverse could have gone a much different way. I don’t think we’ll ever see it again, however, but it’s nice to theorise.
Story – 8/10
Art – 8/10

 

1602: Witch Hunter Angela #4 (Final Issue)
Written By Marguerite Bennett and Kieron Gillen
Art By Stephanie Hans, Kody Chamberlain and Lee Loughridge

Synopsis – Angela and Serah’s adventure comes to a close with a shifting of positions.

Damn this title for having better art every issue. The story itself is fairly convoluted, but the themes behind the plot are decent and moralistic, and very appropriate for the time period this is set in. Like the other issues, variations of characters show up – there’s one very amusing Man near the end – but the main story still regards the relationship between Angela and Serah and their occupation as Witch Hunters. A rather trite cliché is employed, but it opens for a different future for this book and the characters if it ever comes back in some form. The cliffhanger is quite strange, and I believe with a bit of research you could turn up some interesting (if a bit controversial) information.
Story – 7/10
Art – 9/10

 

Siege #4 (Final Issue)
Written By Kieron Gillen
Art By Filipe Andrade and Rachelle Rosenberg

Synopsis – 616 Thanos arrives at the Shield with a plan that could change everything.

Well, well, here we go. What I can only assume is the final act of Secret Wars, with all the Battleworld titles converging on a stand against Doom. I did read Secret Wars #6 before reading this, and I’m very glad they elaborated on the events that occurred there in this issue. The previous Siege issues were focused on the characters, and while this concludes the development of people such as Leo, Kang and the rest of the Shield denizens, it is much greater breadth and importance. I think the art detracts from the madness of this book, but it does its job well enough – and we’ll see the repercussions of this issue, and maybe some of the characters who could return, in the future of Battleworld to come.
Story – 8/10
Art – 5/10

 

Groot #5
Written By Jeff Loveness
Art By Brian Kesinger and Vero Gandini

Synopsis – Groot, Rocket and the team are up against hopeless odds – but you should never underestimate an angry twig.

I like this book for the supporting cast over everything else, though the antagonist is a decent space-pirate stereotype and Rocket and Groot are always fun to see. The Mantron is a hilarious character, and so are the Skrulls, and each with Numinus actually bring a lot of heart as well as humour. Each piece of development for all the characters are exactly the right ones needed, meaning no panel is wasted. The action scenes are also very entertaining. The art has a fantastic, cartoon style that is very well utilised in the action scenes and in the character details.
Story – 9/10
Art – 9/10

 

Old Man Logan #5 (Final Issue)
Written By Brian Michael Bendis
Art By Andrea Sorrentino and Marcelo Maiolo

Synopsis – Logan’s role in Secret Wars is speculated upon and one Warzone is too much for him to handle.

Old Man Logan is a very dramatic and tragic character that has been developed perfectly since his introduction. Bendis doesn’t need thought boxes or mounds of expositional dialogue to convey his feelings, and the showing-not-telling style of this book is excellent. I’ll be surprised if Logan doesn’t transition to the main Secret Wars title after this, but I’m not surprised in the slightest that he was the Wolverine chosen to feature after Battleworld concludes (apart from X-23, of course, but shut up). Some of the panels in this issue are incredible and emotional, from the art to whatever words Bendis chooses to put in. I’m extremely glad Sorrentino and Maiolo are continuing with the next volume of Old Man Logan – I absolutely adore their style – and I’m sure Jeff Lemire will tell some interesting tales in the place of Bendis. It’s quite peculiar how this issue concludes, there’s a chunk of information missed out that I assume will be touched upon soon, but I can see it was to get to the point in which this book needed to end.
Story – 10/10
Art – 10/10

 

Spider-Island #5 (Final Issue)
Written By Christos Gage
Art By Paco Diaz and Frank D’Armata

Synopsis – Only Flash and the Venom symbiote can take down the Spider-Queen, but will Venom cooperate?

I’ve been saying for the past four issues how crazy this book is with the countless different changes and mutations to the characters, but now I see that it was symbolism anyway. The end of the book establishes this, with a really good moral – and I’m glad the team opted to end it this way instead of a cliffhanger or other ending. The characters of this book are definitely the strong point, though the action is a strong contender, between Peter Parker and Flash Thompson’s interaction post-identity reveals (which we never see enough of) and Stegron the Dinosaur Man, there are some very well written and fascinating scenes. The art is great, and Diaz deals with the drastically different and varied appearances with ease and skill. This has been a great series, not just for the madness and interesting story, but for the morals it teaches us in the conclusion also.
Story – 9/10
Art – 9/10

 

Secret Wars #6
Written By Jonathan Hickman
Art By Esad Ribic and Ive Svorcina

Synopsis – Many of the survivors of the final Incursion are revisited, and Valeria reveals her own plans.

This story is so tightly knit that I can’t even begin to try and find plot holes or mistakes. I can see now why the main title was extended, for there are so many important facets to this that to include everything they need to include, everything that has had a precedent set for it since Hickman took over Avengers, that they need the extra issue to fit everything in. I am slightly annoyed that we haven’t seen all of the Incursion survivors in different titles of Battleworld yet – I think we’ve only seen Miles Morales, Star-Lord and Thanos as of this week. So, I’ve been looking forward to seeing this update of character situations for a while (and Black Panther with Namor, oh my god). Thanos has initiated the final phase of Secret Wars, via Siege which had a necessary section this week, and everyone seems to be converging on a final battle between the heretics and Doom. As soon as the self-contained Warzone stories conclude, I think everything is going to heat up massively. Ribic again provides masterful art and the colouring is especially attractive this issue.
Story – 10/10
Art – 9/10

 

And, from a galaxy far far away…

 

Journey to Star Wars – The Force Awakens – Shattered Empire #2
Written By Greg Rucka
Art By Marco Checchetto, Angel Unzueta, Emilio Laiso and Andres Mossa

Synopsis – Shara Bey and a certain Princess are sent on a diplomatic mission to Naboo, where an Imperial shadow is looming…

So I was informed after my review of the first issue about the importance of this title in regard to the Force Awakens and the characters (or offspring of) featured in this. I’ll take measures not to debunk its significance from here on out. This issue again features Bey and mentions her family, and the special guests flit from face to familiar face. The plot does not seem to have any connecting feature at the moment, but I’m sure the story will converge into a single or clear objective. This period following the Death Star’s destruction and the Imperial defeat is largely sparse and quiet, though the scattered remnants of Imperial presence and the small-knitted rebel groups opens the possibility for smaller, more personal battles instead of the sprawling madness such as the Battle of Hoth or Endor, and for these I am excited. There’s not much else to say about this issue, except that it is apparently imperative to read in anticipation of the Force Awakens, and it will likely lead into something more obviously important.
Story – 7/10
Art – 9/10

 

Lando #5 (Final Issue)
Written By Charles Soule
Art By Alex Maleev and Paul Mounts

Synopsis – Betrayals run rampant and one member will have to make an irrevocable sacrifice.

For such a self-contained book – the vast majority takes place on the Imperialis ship – a great deal of content is produced over these five issues. I think the characters such as Chanath, Lobot and Lando himself are the best parts of the book – they take the current continuity and adapt to these situations with it in mind. Aleksis and Pavol are intimidating creatures, and the curious items of the ship only enhance the intensity of the situation over the past couple of issues. They will likely not be revisited, but they send a message nevertheless about the mystical sanctity of the items, and the state of the Star Wars Universe in which very few have what it takes to be Sith or Jedi. Lando receives some character development that I am quite conflicted about – it gives his character more depth but it also detracts from the fundamental themes of his character. While we may not see Lando in a chronological point beyond this for a while, I don’t know whether I want this book’s events revisited – though it has certainly been a good, short series. I like a handful of the characters a lot now that I didn’t before, and the story definitely enriched the Star Wars lore.
Story – 9/10
Art – 7/10

 

Star Wars #10
Written By Jason Aaron
Art By Stuart Immonen, Wade Von Grawbadger and Justin Ponsor

Synopsis – Luke’s time is running out, but Chewbacca and C-3PO are closing in.

This issue, much like the last two, are mainly set-ups for whatever is coming up to end this story arc. C-3PO and Chewbacca have some comical scenes as they tromp around Nar Shaddaa, and Leia and the Solos all receive some development via their interactions with one another, but the real drama is with Luke. He is in the precarious position of being prepared for Grakkus the Hutt’s arena, and it is also the source of most of the Jedi holocrons and equipment – so he can’t leave. The plot only thickens with the cliffhanger, and all these personalities should make for a crazy and exciting final sequence. The art is brilliant, and I think I’m starting to like it more than the first story arc of this Star Wars book.
Story – 8/10
Art – 9/10

Weekly Marvel Roundup for 9/30 – 10/07

Weekly Marvel Roundup for 9/30 - 10/07

Weekly Marvel Roundup for 9/30 - 10/07

Reviews by MattzLadd, CMRO Contributor

 

The Cavalry – S.H.I.E.L.D. 50th Anniversary #1 (One-Shot)
Written By Jody Houser
Art By Luke Ross and Rachelle Rosenberg

Synopsis – An unexplained attack results in a desperate situation for May and some new cadets.

This book looks at the aspect of the training of new S.H.I.E.L.D. operatives and the changes in life that come with it. That, paired with an action spotlight on Agent May – whom has not gotten much comic book attention since her rise to prominence on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. – makes this a decent book in terms of some concepts about rumours and life as an Agent. The plot is fairly lacking, and the team fall back on a standard robot attack in which to progress the story, but the fundamental assets of a book such as this can still be gleaned. The art is good, and there are some nice transitions between the main story and various flashbacks. Altogether a nice book, but not essential for reading into the 50th Anniversary.
Story – 7/10
Art – 7/10

 

Captain America – White #2
Written By Jeph Loeb
Art By Tim Sale and Dave Stewart

Synopsis – Cap, Bucky and the Howling Commandos recover from their crash and find refuge on enemy soil.

This story continues the interesting look into Cap’s morals and history that the first issue explored. The main purpose of this comic is presumably to remain delving into that vein, but the continued story style does limit the moral exploration somewhat. Nevertheless, the story has some plot elements and we may be seeing a full-blown Howling Commandos / Cap WW2 team-up over the next few issues. The personalities of the Commandos are always fun to see, and they enrich what would have been a much more boring story if it was just Cap and Bucky. There’s a very random and hilarious cameo also, that is a complete deus ex machina but it’s still entertaining to see. I still don’t appreciate the art much, as it makes some of the characters look like children and I don’t like the proportions of some bodies. I do think this issue is much worse than the first, but it doesn’t degrade the series so much that they can’t get back on track for the third issue.
Story – 7/10
Art – 4/10

 

Hail Hydra #3
Written By Rick Remender
Art By Roland Boschi, Ed Tadeo, Scott Hanna and Chris Chuckry

Synopsis – Nomad and Ellie formulate a final plan in hopes of defeating Zola and HYDRA.

This title is beginning to degrade to a cliché ‘hopeless group against powerful Empire’ story, obviously with the Captain America twist, but there are still a handful of redeeming factors the creative team can and do explore. Firstly, Nomad is a wise choice for a protagonist. I’ve noticed the tendency to place the supporting characters of the usually main characters in the spotlight throughout Secret Wars – such as Venom in Spider-Island instead of Spider-Man, and Nomad in this instead of Cap – and for the most part it works, allowing for new interactions between the focal characters rogues gallery and the heroes. Nomad versus Arnim Zola, and by extension Leopold Zola, is a good matchup, and this issue will presumably lead into a cataclysmic finale in a few weeks. They are sort of relying on a deus ex machina but it doesn’t immediately solve all the problems so there’s still room for tension.
Story – 7/10
Art – 7/10

 

E Is For Extinction #4 (Final Issue)
Written By Chris Burnham and Dennis Culver
Art By Ramon Villalobos and Ian Herring

Synopsis – Cassandra Nova and Charles Xavier’s feud over Jean Grey and the Phoenix turns the X-Men against one another.

This book wraps up a clever and adventurous series with an excellent story about the Phoenix and Cassandra Nova that I would not find strange being placed next to X-Men epics such as God Loves, Man Kills or the Phoenix Saga. I’m really annoyed that the art wasn’t good – or at least that I disliked the style utilised by Villalobos – because if it was even mediocre then I would have ranked this title among my favourites of Secret Wars. It has the audacity to include numerous integral concepts to the X-Characters, and though it establishes itself within the boundaries of Battleworld, it doesn’t rely on the ubiquitous plot points a lot of the other titles fall back on such as the Thors or people discovering heretical evidence against Doom. Also, it balances dark and uplifting themes perfectly, as it has done throughout the mainly one issue stories detailed through this series, and Nova’s actions are a brilliant way to end the series. It could have done without the cliffhanger, though.
Story – 10/10
Art – 4/10

 

Ghost Racers #4 (Final Issue)
Written By Felipe Smith
Art By Juan Gedeon and Tamra Bonvillain

Synopsis – Robbie has no choice but to return to the Races to save his brother.

So this title has had a rough ride, literally, through the first three issues. The point of the story was unclear, and the single focus on Reyes being targeted by Arcade and Zadkiel became quickly trite. This book would have worked much better with insights into the other Ghost Racers, though this final issue did the best job it could to conclude the series. I liked the twist of Gabe Reyes being included in the Race, as his relationship with Robbie is probably the most developed thing about the characters. The plot becomes very predictable from thereon out, but it is entertaining from an action perspective and the repercussions of the climax here could feed back to the main Secret Wars title if they revisited the Kiliseum (though I honestly doubt they will at this point). We’re moving on from this now, and I won’t remember it fondly, but it did provide us with ample amounts of flame and action for someone less focused on the story to enjoy.
Story – 6/10
Art – 7/10

 

Inferno #5 (Final Issue)
Written By Dennis Hopeless
Art By Javier Garron and Chris Sotomayor

Synopsis – Sinister, Pryor, Colossus and Darkchild’s forces clash, and not many can make it out alive.

This is an awesome book, and it focuses on a twisted relationship that hasn’t been touched on enough in the X-Men’s history. The story could have worked fine with just Colossus and Darkchild’s conflict, but with the addition of multiple other intentions from Mister Sinister and Madelyne Pryor, this last issue resulted in both a blessing and a curse. On one hand, the perspectives made this book more interesting and dramatic from both the action and story points of view, but also it made it difficult to wrap up all the plot points in this one issue and the lack of exposition makes this largely a book for people very familiar with characters and concepts of the X-Men. As a result, I have enjoyed this series very much, but a new or younger reader would be very much out of their depth here, and this much of a precedent to read kind of makes it unfitting to be placed in such a popular event. The art from Garron is great, and he with the rest of the art team portray the many characters accurately and meticulously.
Story – 8/10
Art – 9/10

 

M.O.D.O.K. Assassin #5 (Final Issue)
Written By Christopher Yost
Art By Amilcar Pinna, Terry Pallot and Rachelle Rosenberg

Synopsis – Mordo reveals his plan, and M.O.D.O.K. expresses his feelings.

After the lack of direction in the last issue, I am extremely glad that this sets up back on the right track. My main gripe with issue #4 was that it didn’t make sense that Mordo would be tied as a direct enemy to M.O.D.O.K. in this series, though in this issue his plan is revealed (and M.O.D.O.K. has the absolute best response to it) and he and Clea become characters with intentions and motives in their own right. Thus, with the discrepancies resolved, we are free to enjoy the gruesome violence and comedy that make this title so fun – and of course there are some fitting developments to end the series that save it from simply being a murder fest. Angela and M.O.D.O.K. are a good pairing that prompts comedy and some serious development for the latter – though I think they have exhausted all the possible directions to go in in this without actually giving the two a loving relationship, because I don’t think that would ever happen. The artists deal with the countless panels of bright magic blasts and explosions masterfully, and we even get to see Throg. This is definitely one of my favourite titles of Battleworld.
Story – 9/10
Art – 9/10

 

S.H.I.E.L.D. #10
Written By Mark Waid
Art By Evan Shaner and Matthew Wilson

Synopsis – Howard the Duck is accompanied by Agent Fitz in a multiversal adventure that is definitely not a parody of Spider-Verse.

So I was expecting something resembling issue #9 of this series when I began reading it, but I could not have been more wrong. Where last issue was dramatic and intelligent, this is comedic and pretty ridiculous. I respect Howard the Duck a fair amount now due to his rise to prominence in his own title earlier this year, and this only continues his hilarity. It’s not very hefty in terms of plot as it simply takes the basic story from Spider-Verse and twists it into a Duck vs. Duck-related Galactus / French translation-gag provider situation, meaning the quality of the issue relies heavily on the comedy – and it doesn’t fail in that department. This is probably not very fitting for a S.H.I.E.L.D. book, and for the admirers of issue #9 and the current 50th Anniversary event I would say hold back on reading this for a couple of weeks, but definitely do as it is a fun and wacky one-shot from our favourite Marvel Duck.
Story – 8/10
Art – 8/10

Weekly Marvel Roundup for 9/23 – 9/30

Weekly Review Roundup for 09/23 - 9/30

Weekly Review Roundup for 09/23 - 9/30

Reviews by MattzLadd, CMRO Contributor

 

Fury: S.H.I.E.L.D. 50th Anniversary #1 (One-Shot)
Written By David F. Walker
Art By Lee Ferguson and Jason Keith

Synopsis – Nick Fury, Jr and Sr, cooperate in a mission involving time travel and the Hate-Monger.

I would say that this issue is the one that is most deserving of the 50th Anniversary designation. Not only does it include two of the men who are absolutely integral to the organisation’s history, it also provides us with an intriguing story about time displacement and the butterfly effect. I was (only slightly) disappointed that the Hate-Monger encountered in this issue wasn’t an Adolf Hitler clone, but the concept of his plan regarding race conflict made sense. A significantly interesting thing that occurred, without spoilers, is the development of a character from the past with the impact of a character from the present – Gabe Jones. I love correct utilisations of time travel in comic books, and this book did it very well, and with an appropriate and thoroughly entertaining storyline. The art as well is awesome, and for the first few pages it does a parallel storyline layout that is very interesting. I’m thankful that they didn’t use two different artists for two different time periods as they have been doing recently in other books, as one is usually worse than the other, yet this is brilliant throughout in both periods.
Story – 9/10
Art – 9/10

 

Deadpool vs. Thanos #2
Written By Tim Seeley
Art By Elmo Bondoc and Ruth Redmond

Synopsis – Deadpool and Thanos take steps in their mission to find Mistress Death, and restore the ability for people to die.

I can say one thing, that this is better than Torchwood: Miracle Day, or
whatever that was. The story of this series holds some promise, but I think there’s an even chance that it could be clever or convoluted. So far, I have not discerned any of the mysteries set up by the first issue, and this book does not directly answer any of them – instead it explores the situation of eternal life provided to various cosmic characters, such as a surprise appearance from the Guardians of the Galaxy, as well as a strange new group related to Thanos and his action with the Infinity Gauntlet – when he murdered half of the Universe’s inhabitants. There is little development in the plot, but the exchanges between Thanos and Deadpool is entertaining enough to keep the issue interesting. The team will have to come up with something intuitive to make this series really good, but it is OK for the moment.
Story – 7/10
Art – 8/10

 

1872 #3
Written By Gerry Duggan
Art By Nik Virella and Lee Loughridge

Synopsis – Red Wolf embarks on a spree of revenge as Banner and Bucky’s widow confront Roxxon.

This title makes use of brand new period versions of the main characters instead of reusing the ones already established in series’ such as 1602 and 2099, and I must say these characters are very interesting. I am especially intrigued with this Tony Stark, and the events that happen with Bruce Banner this issue should result in an expected and anticipated outcome for him. The utilisation of Red Wolf as the primary character is a good choice, he has the most development of any character right out the gate and with the wide array of villains throughout Timely, we get to see some great action scenes. This title has been really good so far, and I bet the finale will not lower the bar. I’d very much like to see an 1872 series re-emerge after Secret Wars, also.
Story – 9/10
Art – 7/10

 

Captain Marvel and the Carol Corps #4 (Final Issue)
Written By Kelly Sue DeConnick and Kelly Thompson
Art By Laura Braga, Paolo Pantalena and Lee Loughridge

Synopsis – Cap and the Banshees battle the Thors for… something.

I could just reiterate everything I said about this title in my review of issue #3, but I’ll choose to just sum it up to save everyone the time and effort. Basically, I stated that the characters were underdeveloped embodiments of singular emotions and the story was flimsy and changed targets every issue. The same applies here, with the new target being everyone wants Cap to get to space, or something? It’s not clear in the slightest, and I can’t see it being as important as the story bigs it up to be. Cap uses the same evasion manoeuvre she’s used three times already in this series and there isn’t much originality in the way of action. On the bright side, the art is much better thanks to the changing to Braga and Pantalena, but it’s too late to even remotely save this utterly pointless title.
Story – 3/10
Art – 9/10

 

Runaways #4 (Final Issue)
Written By Noelle Stevenson
Art By Sanford Greene, Noelle Stevenson and John Rauch

Synopsis – The newly formed Runaways exploit a long shot in their hope of escaping the Institute.

This title has been very good from the start, using different techniques each issue to engage our interest, such as the school tone of the first issue, the sci-fi battle of the second, the domain travelling of the third, and finally this issue to tie it all together. The book relies heavily on its cast of characters, including some integral characters to Secret Wars itself such as Valeria Richards, and each are developed in an appropriate way. The events of this issue are perhaps important enough to herald a response from Doom, and for Valeria to receive additional attention. The core concepts and morals of the title are recapped well in this issue, and there are some exciting scenes that flow well from one to the other. Overall, I have enjoyed this book a lot and I would recommend it to kids and adults alike, though the art could be better.
Story – 7.5/10
Art – 6/10

 

Weirdworld #4

Written By Jason Aaron
Art By Mike Del Mundo and Marco D’Alfonso

Synopsis – The Queen of the Man-Things gives Arkon and Skull an intervention.

By Doom, this title is good. I cannot think of a single instance in which a writer could take a collection of mostly unknown and irrelevant characters – Arkon, Skull, a certain woman in this issue – and form such a compelling plot around them. Hell, the most recognisable figure in this book is Morgana Le Fay, which says a lot about the amount of times these characters have been featured before. I only knew of Arkon because I had read his introduction in the late 60s Avengers comics before starting Weirdworld, yet I am honestly interested in him and his quest to get back to Polemachus. Weirdworld is proving to be the most intriguing and entertaining domain of all Battleworld, and I’m going to be sad to see it go after this issue. If that wasn’t good enough, Mike Del Mundo is the best artist working on Secret Wars, in my opinion, and the colouring is magnificent.
Story – 9/10
Art – 10/10

 

X-Tinction Agenda #4 (Final Issue)
Written By Mark Guggenheim
Art By Carmine Di Giandomenico and Nolan Woodard

Synopsis – The X-Men of both Genosha and X-City must unite to beat Cameron Hodge.

I can respect this title for opting to use a lot of the underused X-Characters, but I do think that it uses too many of them. It’s sometimes hard to discern what is going on in the action scenes, and though they are exciting and diverse, they don’t contribute much in terms of the story. This entire title hasn’t actually achieved much, it’s an extremely self-contained book that is basically the lead-up to one big fight at the end. The focus on Rahne and Havok is nice to see, but these versions in these situations will likely never be revisited, so it negates the development provided to the characters. The book also ends with a stupid cliffhanger – even though it’s the final issue and this will never be addressed again. Overall, the title has been good for action, but not for characters or plot. The art is decent, but aside from that there is nothing to distinguish this title from the several X-books already occurring throughout Secret Wars.
Story – 5/10
Art – 7/10

 

Inhumans – Attilan Rising #5 (Final Issue)
Written By Charles Soule
Art By John Timms, Roberto Poggi and Frank D’Armata

Synopsis – Black Bolt and Medusa enact their final attack, and Doom shows his hand.

Wow, I expected this title would be fairly important – but this is unprecedented in the way it develops the situation of Battleworld, and it gives us insight into some of the abilities of Doom in his position as God. The core Inhumans team has always worked well together, but what we haven’t seen is a standard blending of the original Royal Family and the various new Inhumans spawned during Infinity. This book takes steps towards what I am presuming will be a heavy focus of the world after Secret Wars, with the two Inhuman groups being slowly brought together, and the inevitable attention the Inhumans will receive due to the situation with the rights and the cinematic endeavours. There’s great art to illustrate a great story, filled with fascinating variations of the Inhumans we know, and unless I am mistaken – this is the first time Doom has appeared personally outside of the main Secret Wars title. I’ve enjoyed this book a lot, and I can’t wait to see what they do with the Inhumans (and especially Karnak) following Battleworld.
Story – 10/10
Art – 9/10

 

Years of Future Past #5 (Final Issue)
Written By Marguerite Bennett
Art By Mike Norton and FCO Plascencia

Synopsis – A final showdown between Cameron and Chrissie determines the coming fate of the remaining mutants.

I sincerely hope I never have to see Cameron or Chrissie Pryde again, because I really dislike them as characters. Both are self-important and ignorant, they treat themselves as the greatest mutants of all when they really should have been insignificant side characters. The book itself has taken too long to choose one direction to go in, and so they barely wrap up anything in the final issue and it’s extremely convoluted. There is an attempted metaphorical moral within, but it falls flat on its face along with the unnecessary and stupid twists the past few issues have sprung. Maybe if this title had fifteen issues in which to tell the story, it might have worked. However, with this it seems rushed, contradictory and too reliant on feeding us information rather than letting us read and enjoy for ourselves.
Story – 3/10
Art – 9/10

 

And, from a galaxy far far away…

 

Kanan – The Last Padawan #6
Written By Greg Weisman
Art By Jacopo Camagni and David Curiel

Synopsis – Kanan explores his past on a mission that has both good and bad implications.

It has been emphasised before of the importance of Kaller to the history of Kanan, and throughout this issue the art cleverly details past events while a current story is followed. The plot seems banal and unimportant, but the characters that become associated with it and events that occur between them all result in an enticing cliffhanger and a promising new storyline arising involving some of the characters. The art is great, especially for illustrating some of the stranger-looking races found on Kaller, and the locations are varied enough to allow the artists to really show off.
Story – 8/10
Art – 9/10

Weekly Marvel Roundup for 9/16 – 9/23

Weekly Marvel Roundup for 09/16 - 09/23

Weekly Marvel Roundup for 09/16 - 09/23

 

Reviews by MattzLadd, CMRO Contributor

 

Agent Carter – S.H.I.E.L.D. 50th Anniversary #1 (One-Shot)
Written By Kathryn Immonen
Art By Rich Ellis and Rachel Rosenberg

Synopsis – Peggy Carter and the Lady Sif investigate an attack that might not be all that it seems…

If I’m honest, I don’t like Peggy Carter in practically all the instances I have seen her in. I never finished the show running alongside Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and the only comics I have seen her young in is Captain America throwbacks to WW2. So this comic begs the question – why is a young Peggy Carter working with S.H.I.E.L.D. in 1966, in the day when it was Sharon Carter in that position – whom, if I am not mistaken, is Peggy’s niece? Perhaps there was a retcon somewhere I have not taken into account, but this exposition does not make any sense. Otherwise, I very much enjoyed both Carter as a character and the story included in this book. She not only is one of the very few who don’t bend over backwards for S.H.I.E.L.D. and her banter with Sif is entertaining. Overall, it’s a nice throwback to the organisation’s situation in the 60s, action packed, and the art is fairly decent also.
Story – 8/10
Art – 7/10

 

Captain America – White #1
Written By Jeph Loeb
Art By Tim Sale and Dave Stewart

Synopsis – Jeph Loeb’s in-depth autopsies of characters continues with Captain America.

Captain America and Bucky have a tragic and long-standing relationship. Ever since Bucky’s discovery of Rogers changing into his costume, it’s obvious to see the latter’s constant worries and regrets regarding his partner. It’s also why the finality of Bucky’s ‘death’ in their final fight with Baron Zemo was so impactful upon Cap’s character throughout his revival in the 60s and especially when Bucky returned as the Winter Soldier. This book looks further into this relationship, as these Loeb-led arcs often do, so there is the expectation of emotional scenes between the characters. In this book, there are certainly some great moments. The inclusion of Sgt. Fury and the Howling Commandos is interesting to see, specifically in the fact that Rogers hasn’t revealed his secret identity and so we see two different reactions to the Captain’s two different personas from the WW2 team. There’s also a lot of action that harkens back to the wartime comics, and there’s more than enough humour and drama besides to cover all bases. The art is a bit iffy from page to page, in my opinion, but there are some double-spreads that look really nice.
Story – 8/10
Art – 5/10

 

House of M #3
Written By Dennis Hopeless and Cullen Bunn
Art By Ario Anindito and Matthew Wilson

Synopsis – Magnus strikes an unlikely deal as Namor and Pietro access to power.

This is now my favourite title since Planet Hulk’s conclusion. The story is wild and really fun, and it explores intuitive new ideas in the world of House of M that we could have easily seen more from. It heavily features some of my absolute favourite characters, Namor, Magneto and his family, Hawkeye, and each of them has their own developments to alter them from their 616 counterparts that don’t detract from the fundamentals of their personalities. I expressed all this in my review of the second issue, except I can now say that the story has not lost pace – if anything it has introduced a more complex and more promising storyline that heralds a cataclysmic end to this arc next issue – and a new artist has been brought on board. Where Failla was good, Anindito is fantastic. I definitely cannot wait for the next issue, though this will make the sludge through the lesser aspects of Battleworld (not that there are many) all the more difficult.
Story – 10/10
Art – 10/10

 

Age of Apocalypse #4
Written By Fabian Icieza
Art By Iban Coello and David Curiel

Synopsis – Apocalypse’s virus afflicts all, as a small team of X-Men discover the truth.

This issue is a massive deviation from the three issues leading up to it. Not only has the art changed (sadly away from the awesome 90s art), and though it is still really good, it doesn’t have its own special factor anymore. Cypher seems to no longer be the featured protagonist, as this book spends most of its time with Wolverine, Burner, and the Summers brothers. Apocalypse gets his spotlight as permitted by the title – another change from the prominence we have seen from the Horsemen in the initial issues. However, his entire plan that we’ve led up to is entirely anticlimactic – and we get to see a new primary villain to only be noticed in the final issue. It’s a sudden drastic change, and it is confusing to me as I think they had a perfect story coming through. I would expect this from an issue #2, but not the penultimate book.
Story – 6/10
Art – 9/10

 

Guardians of Knowhere #4 (Final Issue)
Written By Brian Michael Bendis
Art By Mike Deodato and Frank Martin

Synopsis – The mysterious woman only deepens Gamora’s concerns about her memory.

Speaking of titles suddenly changing their plots, this one has done it also. I am partly glad in this instance, however, as the first three issues were pretty dull – just an unknown villain fighting with a handful of Guardians and the standard Thors vs. Rebels plot. Now, we segue into the other standard plot for Battleworld – that of the returning memories and heresy against Doom storyline. This arrives in the message of the mysterious woman and a familiar face who has appeared several times already around Secret Wars. It’s clear to see now that things are heating up, and many titles if they head in this direction will be more involved in the core Secret Wars story in the coming issues. This title specifically has ended, but the characters of it will appear in a new title for the latter stage of Secret Wars – Secret Wars and the Guardians of the Galaxy. I haven’t seen this from anyone else, so perhaps this title is more important than it appears to be.
Story – 8/10
Art – 8/10

 

Infinity Gauntlet #4
Written By Dustin Weaver
Art By Gerry Duggan and Rain Beredo

Synopsis – Chaos erupts as the ragtag group face off against Adam Warlock.

Well, I said before that an issue could not get crazier than House of M #2, but I was wrong. The only exposition for this scene is the Nova Corps, members of the Guardians of the Galaxy and Thanos against Warlock and his Knights of Xandar. I thought Adam was going to be a good guy when he first appeared, but upon the first mention of ‘Magus’ which happens early in this issue, you can see why that is false. What follows for the majority of this book is an epic fight between many different players, including clashes with various Infinity Stones in play. New ideas are introduced and events are enacted which set up a very interesting plot for the final issue. I’m curious to see how a certain character from the main Secret Wars title ties in to it, if indeed he does. The art is exceptional, and there are certainly enough varied characters for the artists to show off with. Overall, a very good issue and a perfect set up for the finale.
Story – 8/10
Art – 9/10

 

Spider-Island #4
Written By Christos Gage
Art By Paco Diaz and Frank D’Armata

Synopsis – The mutated team initiate a plan where failure is not an option.

Forget everything I said about crazy, I can’t believe I didn’t take everything about this title into account. I don’t think there is a single person who is entirely human in this book anymore, meaning we get a city-wide fight between spiders and dinosaurs and lizards and werewolves. It’s such a fun title that I can put aside my arachnophobia and appreciate the insanity that goes on. I would have liked to see more of the Green Goblin Iron Man, I think he was the one who had the most promise, but it’s true that he may have become a villain and distracted everyone from the main purpose of this book – to take down the Spider-Queen. This isn’t a lengthy book so there’s not much more I can say about it, other than that I am excited for the conclusion. The art continues to be magnificent, making this an epic book despite the spiders.
Story – 8/10
Art – 9/10

 

All-New Hawkeye #5
Written By Jeff Lemire
Art By Ramon Perez and Ian Herring

Synopsis – Clint and Kate experience difficulties as HYDRA targets the Communion kids.

I’ve read a little of the All-New Hawkeye, with the watercolour past scenes, and I read the beginning of Hawkeye Vol 4 when Kate Bishop was introduced (the Tape was really good) but I can’t appreciate this issue with its mixing of the two. Both art styles utilised are bad in their own way, and I don’t know what the hell is going on with the story in the present. I think we have seen enough of Clint and Barney’s life in the circus with Swordsman, so this issue basically just reiterates the concepts of it. Also, Clint is old at the end? And Kate is still young? I don’t know, and I don’t much care to be honest.
Story – 3/10
Art – 4/10

 

Armor Wars #5 (Final Issue)
Written By James Robinson
Art By Marcio Takara and Esther Sanz

Synopsis – Battle rages in Technopolis as Stark unveils the ‘why’ of his actions.

I think this title has been just OK since the beginning. It has a nice idea about everyone requiring Iron Man-esque suits to live, but aside from that the main plot is ridiculously convoluted and nonsensical. I’ll be covering some spoilers which you probably will have figured out by now from the final issue, but if not then be warned. Firstly, Stark maintains the façade that it is an unknown virus so people will buy his armour and not look on him as an arbitrary source, but the fact is that it was Howard and not Tony who enacted the virus. Tony continuing to keep everyone in armour would not be his fault, as he is not responsible for creating the virus. Secondly, Tony says that Doom does not care what he does as long as he is loyal, yet why does Doom send a bunch of Thors to apprehend Tony and Arno after the reveal that – “Oh, Tony is making money off everyone buying suits and parts from him, except that it wasn’t his fault and people will die if they don’t.” If you can’t tell, I didn’t like this story.
Story – 2/10
Art – 7/10

 

Secret Wars Journal #5 (Final Issue)
Written By Jen and Sylvia Soska and Aaron Alexovich
Art By Alec Morgan, Nolan Woodard, Diogo Saito and Rachelle Rosenberg

Synopsis – The Night Nurse fights against the Techno-Organic Virus while an android Millie the Model spreads Doom’s word.

This book comprises of basically two stories involving some of the few people who are permitted to travel between the domains of Battleworld. The first is the Night Nurse, whom in this issue encounters a strain of the Techno-Organic Virus. I can’t say much for the content of this part, as there isn’t much of it. Carter explores some of the fundamental concerns of her character, and we get an insight into proceedings in the Wastelands, but aside from that it’s a rather lacklustre story with not much relevance. The second story on this issue is amusing and very inventive. The creative team take Millie the Model, from the Atlas days of Marvel, and alter her into an android envoy for Doom in the outer domains of Battleworld. What follows in an entertaining exploration of Westchester and some really great art. Overall, it’s a decent book but it’s entirely skippable also.
Story – 1st: 5/10 2nd: 7/10
Art – 1st: 5/10 2nd: 9/10

 

Spider-Verse #5 (Final Issue)
Written By Mike Costa
Art By Andre Araujo and Rachelle Rosenberg

Synopsis – The Spider-Team fight to overthrow Osborn and the Sinister Six.

The late Spider-Verse event laid a lot of precedents for the handling of many of these characters – that of their core traits and skills, and brief summaries of their pasts and morality. I think the intention was always to continue the character’s storylines following the multiversal event, so it wasn’t a surprise to see this title reappearing – and we’ll likely see more of Anya’s Spider-Girl and maybe even Spider-Ham. This title specifically has been good, focusing on some of the other characters than Peter Parker himself, and the villainous Sinister Six and Norman Osborn are always entertaining to see. The integration of the title into a broader Secret Wars concept was done well with Osborn’s chair and the Thor (although Danger was an odd choice), and overall I enjoyed the series as well as the art.
Story – 8/10
Art – 8/10

 

Bucky Barnes – The Winter Soldier #11
Written By Ales Kot
Art By Landon Foss, Michael Walsh, Marco Rudy, and Jordan Boyd

Synopsis – Two different time periods find Bucky meeting with his lover Ventolin.

This is a pure product of Bucky’s new position as a space-going problem solver, and I can’t say for sure yet whether he suits the role. This issue is very much only enjoyable if you have been following the storyline of Bucky in the past few issues, and as I haven’t I missed out on a lot of the point of the book. His relationship with Ventolin is ostensibly special as time makes no difference – she seems to treat him the same when he is both old and young. The rest of the book is a collection of short musings and concepts, and I followed some to good conclusions. Both forms of the art found within this book are also good, though the art involving young Bucky is far superior to the old counterpart.
Story – 6/10
Art – 8/10

 

And, from a galaxy far far away…

 

Lando #4
Written By Charles Soule
Art By Alex Maleev and Paul Mounts

Synopsis – Chanath Cha closes in while Aleksin and Pavol undergo a change.

This issue raises the stakes a lot by the end of it in anticipation for the conclusion, and it has become very interesting (not that it wasn’t good before). The setting of an enclosed space full of narrow corridors and dark rooms is perfect for the ‘hunter’ type style the book takes on. There are some rather sudden, though explained, alterations in allegiance – meaning the final issue will hold an entirely different conflict than what one would expect after reading the first three issues – yet I think this works better, and it is likely going to be a tension-filled romp when the final issue comes out. There is some great art contained within, especially with the utilisation of shadows, which suits this title.
Story – 8/10
Art – 8/10

 

Star Wars #9
Written By Jason Aaron
Art By Stuart Immonen, Wade Von Grawbadger and Justin Ponsor

Synopsis – Luke runs afoul of powerful trouble while Han and Leia form a flimsy alliance with Sana Solo.

Once again, this title does not lose pace. Luke’s storyline is arguably the most interesting and dramatic here, yet Han and Leia have some short and amusing scenes. There are a couple of promising new supporting characters brought in this issue, and the subject of last issue’s cliffhanger, Sana Solo, receives some development and brings herself into close proximity with Han and the Princess, which can only end in disaster. A couple of familiar faces arrive at the end to further enrich Luke’s new arc – which is proving to be the best route to take while using Nar Shaddaa – and I am honestly very excited for the next issue to come, though the other Star Wars tie-ins are by no means boring in the meantime.
Story – 9/10
Art – 9/10